Psychotherapy Blog

 

Conduct Therapy Sessions Like Ellis Or Rogers In 7 Days Or Your Money Back!

Posted by Howard Rosenthal, EdD on 12/3/11 - 8:19 PM
Okay Rosenthal, tell me something about psychotherapy I don't know. Fine: I will! If you've read all the textbooks, analyzed the classics, and been to enough workshops to receive frequent flyer miles, I've got something new to teach you so put down the managed care forms, and pay attention. My secret weapon for improving your psychotherapy sessions comes from the field of copywriting. That's correct, I said copywriting. Copywriting is the act of creating written documents that persuade customers to reach...

Ethical Guidelines: Do We Really Want What Is Best For Our Clients?

Posted by Howard Rosenthal, EdD on 11/28/11 - 3:05 PM
Most therapists are familiar with the affliction of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). SAD impacts approximately seven million people each year in America, mainly women. At one point in my career I shared a private practice office with a psychiatrist. She would use the office on some days and I would use it on others. When I entered the office for the first time I was struck by the fact that she had a phototherapy apparatus in the room. It was physically...

How One Desperate St. Louis Psychotherapist Cured A Schizophrenic

Posted by Howard Rosenthal, EdD on 11/18/11 - 3:13 PM
Maggie began the session by telling me that she had been diagnosed by three different psychiatrists. The good news was that all three agreed on the diagnosis. The bad news was that each psychiatrist told her she was schizophrenic. "So, what brings you here today?" I asked. "Well, I saw something in the newspaper and it said you wrote some books on mental health and teach in the field so I thought you might know something these psychiatrists don't." (Wow. How refreshing. A...

Supervision of Executive Coaching

Posted by John Marzillier, PhD on 9/14/11 - 11:04 AM
Last year I was tempted out of my retirement as a psychotherapist to provide supervision to a group of colleagues working with business executives. This was not psychotherapy but coaching, and my protests that I had never done any coaching or even read very much about it were overruled: they wanted me and they had every confidence that I would do a good job. I was flattered of course, intrigued too, and the extra money was welcome. So I began....

Training for the Treatment of Eating Disorders

Posted by Tony Rousmaniere, PsyD on 8/17/11 - 10:41 PM
Eating disorders are widely recognized as some of the most challenging psychological diagnoses. I was surprised to learn that they are also the most dangerous: eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any diagnosis. Many clinicians assume that eating disorders only occur in young women. However, research has shown that the frequency of eating disorders is rising across a wide range of client populations, including men, middle-aged, and the elderly. Regardless of the population you work with, sooner or later you will encounter clients with eating disorders.
Filed under: Therapy Training

Listening versus Hearing in Psychotherapy

Posted by John Marzillier, PhD on 7/27/11 - 1:50 PM
In my memoir, The Gossamer Thread: My Life as a Psychotherapist, I describe my treatment of ‘Angie’, a young mother with horrific fantasies of killing her two young children by stabbing them through the heart with a kitchen knife. It was back in the 1980s and I was in the process of shedding my old behaviour therapy skin, realising I needed to listen to the client more carefully before embarking on any specific intervention. My therapy was a success, or...

Turning Blaming into Confiding in Couples Therapy

Posted by Dan Wile, PhD on 6/23/11 - 9:06 AM
The defining task in a Collaborative Couple Therapy session is to create an intimate conversation out of whatever is happening—frequently a fight. Sometimes that means helping the partner who has just been accused deal with the accusation. Sometimes, and this is my focus in this write-up, that means reshaping the accusing partner’s angry statement. I speak as if I were that partner, translating his/her blaming statement into a confiding one, in a method similar to doubling in psychodrama. I show...
Filed under: Couples Therapy

Training in Couples Therapy

Posted by Tony Rousmaniere, PsyD on 6/3/11 - 3:05 PM
Why might a therapist who works primarily with individuals consider studying couples’ therapy? If you work from an attachment perspective, as an increasing number of therapists do, then training in couples therapy may greatly inform and improve your work.

The 7 real reasons why psychotherapists flunk their licensing and certification exams

Posted by Howard Rosenthal, EdD on 5/12/11 - 11:37 PM
A friend of mine (let's call him Kurt to preserve confidentiality and perhaps more importantly not to embarrass him) told me was gearing up to take his state licensing exam. Had he prepared for the exam? "Come on Rosenthal, I just spent two of the best years of life in grad school and another three or so in supervision. I think I know this stuff by now." "Really," I remarked. "Who is the father of rational emotive behavior therapy?" "Come on dude, that's...

Training in Microexpressions

Posted by Tony Rousmaniere, PsyD on 5/12/11 - 11:59 AM
There is a growing movement in psychotherapy towards reading clients’ facial microexpressions and body “tells”.  One of the leaders in this movement is Stan Tatkin, PsyD, who teaches a Psychobiological Approach to Couples Therapy (PACT).  I recently talked with Dr. Tatkin about how he uses microexpressions to enhance couples therapy.
Back to Top ▲