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Beyond Psychotherapy: Working Outside the Medical Model

Beyond Psychotherapy: Working Outside the Medical Model

by John A. Martin

Dr. Martin shares his reasons for leaving the insurance game.
"Do you take insurance?" is a question I often get from prospective clients, although less frequently these days.
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John A. MartinJohn Martin is a licensed psychologist in San Francisco. He has been practicing for more than 25 years. He received his PhD from Stanford University and spent many years as a teacher and researcher there before turning to full-time independent private practice work. For more information about John or to contact him, please visit his website, jamartin.com.
This is an excellent article and a great example of what can be done to assist people with their difficulties without imposing labels of pathology. Thousands of therapists and thousands of "consumers" eschew the medical model so why does this model continue to dominate psychotherapy? I suspect it's politics and money.... not good science -- that keeps it in place.
Anonymous
Wonderful!! Tragic too. In the UK it is getting worse the medicalisation of psychological problems. This article presents a stand against the men and women in grey suits who dictate what therapy people should have on very shaky outcomes, especially CBT longterm outcome. Whether Existential, TA, Solution Focused, Gestalt, STDynamic therapy (see Allen Abbass' UK N.I.C.E paper in the UK and this excellent website for his research for S-T Psychodynamic therapy.) It is very depressing the state and corporate coercion...and I write as a politically small conservative. It is no doubt in my mind that the Global Crash of 2008 was the accumulation of straight forward, rampant gambling addiction. no need for intellectual explanations. Bankers and traders worked for the buzz/fix first, money, and lots desired I say - second. I salute you Dr Martin. As Dr William Glasser said to a colleague a few years ago, we have the pleasure of seeing the red book of misery number 5 (DSM-V) out soon - to reduce human misery or emptiness to all sorts of colourful symptoms. Thomas Szasz says it was seven diagnosis in his day as a student. As Prof Irv Yalom said to me in London once, the psychologist, psychotherapist, counsellor coach... should have a good literary module of classics in their training as well as the scientific stuff and 'techniques' we endured in our training. After all Freud was an artist first then 'scientist' - and remember that the diagnosis in the tenth session will be very different from the first. Bravo and thank you to Dr Martin and all. John Stewart, Psychologist. London, UK.
John Stewart. Psychologist. London. UK.
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